Elizabethan era of music

From popular ballads to ringing psalms, Elizabethan music was creative, pleasant and stirring.

Elizabethan era of music

The authenticity of the songs

Religion[ edit ] The Church was a major influence for music in the 16th century. The Puritans wanted to do away with all Church music, but the will of the people to sing only made it more predominant.

The style of the church music was known as choral polyphony. Hundreds of hymns were written for the church. Many of those are still sung today. It was very common of that time for commoners to have music played for them whenever they wanted, too.

She could play the lute and virginalsa small form of a harpsichord, sang, and even claimed to have composed dance music. Queen Elizabeth encouraged composers and musicians, employing over seventy musicians and singers.

Queen Elizabeth also enjoyed dancing. Musicians[ edit ] Town musicians were known as Waits. The Waits have been in existence as far back as the medieval period. The role of the Waits was to perform at public occasions of the viewing pleasure of the town.

They were to play original composed music. Street musicians or travelling minstrels were looked down upon. They were feared and soon grew out of style and were replaced by the tavern and theatre musician.

Street music was common to be heard at markets and fairs. The music was usually light and quick. They performed using fiddles, lutes, recordersand small percussion instruments attracting crowds whenever they played.

Location on stage meant everything to a theatre musician. The location gave certain effects to the sound produced. This could the impression of distance or providing an atmosphere to the plays and performances done.

Theatre music became even more popular with the rise of William Shakespeare in Composers[ edit ] William Byrd Many composers of the period are still known by name, today. Many of his songs still exist today.

William Byrd was the chief organist and composer for Queen Elizabeth. Also during the 16th century were John Bull —best-known organist of the Elizabethan era, and John Dowland —leading composer of lute music. John Dowland published his first book of songs or Ayres in It became a bestseller.

These composers, among others, would give rise to the English Madrigal School which, while brief, was incredibly popular. For the modern person, renaissance instruments appear odd. In some cases, these were extended up sopranino, garklein and in others, down quart bass, contrabass, etc.

This arrangement had been in use for centuries. Playing instruments from the same family together was referred to as playing in consort. Consorts were considered loud or soft, and the exact application of these titles is sometimes hard to pin down.

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Generally, loud consorts consisted of cornetti, sackbuts, shawms and the higher-pitched recorders and flutes. Soft consorts generally included the viols, flutes, recorders, krummhorns and other of the quieter instruments.

Instruments of the 16th century could be broken down into four main types: The lute was the most popular stringed instrument. The lute is identifiable by its size and shape, with the pear-shaped body and angled head.The Elizabethan era is the epoch in the Tudor period of the history of England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (–).

Elizabethan era of music

Historians often depict it as the golden age in English history. Find elizabethan tracks, artists, and albums. Find the latest in elizabethan music at benjaminpohle.com Find elizabethan tracks, artists, and albums.

Find the latest in elizabethan music at benjaminpohle.com Playing via Spotify Playing via YouTube. Playback options Listening on Switch Spotify device. Musical instruments were a big part of the Elizabethan Era. There were very many types music (see on page Types of Music), very many uses of the instruments and of course, many different instruments.

Elizabethan era of music

Elizabethan music thus entered the homes and lives of all people. Native folk music was seen being played at the dinner tables when families came together for a meal. People who belonged to the higher strata of society in this era were known to hire a musician almost every night.

Elizabethan music thus entered the homes and lives of all people. Native folk music was seen being played at the dinner tables when families came together for a meal. People who belonged to the higher strata of society in this era were known to hire a musician almost every night.

Music in the Elizabethan Era, or Elizabethan Music, refers to music during the reign of Queen Elizabeth the I (–), oft titled The Golden Age of English History.

It was a period in which English music was developed to a level that commanded respect from the rest of Western Civilization.

Elizabethan England Music,Elizabethan Era Musical Instrumnents History and Facts